ScrollToTop

symmedia SP/1 Monitoring

Whereas traditional Condition Monitoring is generally utilised locally on individual machines, symmedia SP/1 Monitoring concurrently monitors many machines worldwide. This creates totally new opportunities for machine manufacturers which can be used to provide more extensive customer support when it comes to maintenance. Machine manufacturers can obtain information about the status and production behaviour of the machines and use this to derive new, need-oriented products. Availability commitments, productivity consultancy (also OEE Overall Equipment Effectiveness) and operator models can now be supported effectively.

The reduced display of the user interface of symmedia SP/1 Monitoring
The reduced display of the user interface of symmedia SP/1 Monitoring

How Does Data Acquisition Work?

To monitor a machine, a wide range of data types must first be acquired and evaluated. One of the biggest challenges of Condition Monitoring is to precisely identify and extract any significant values from the data flow, since at the outset a machine provides a very large volume of totally unfiltered data. This „raw data“ may for instance originate from the machine controllers (live data) or from databases (historic data and log files).

The first step is standardisation. One could imagine this data flow from such diverse sources to be like an orchestra, in which every instrument is playing according to its own internal rules – and in the midst of the noise of this chaos the melody is totally destroyed.

  • One Language. symmedia SP/1 now becomes the conductor who brings the confusion of the various instruments under control. The system automatically recognises the language and format of nearly every data source and converts it into a standardised format. This enables the data items to be „attuned“ and correlated to each other.
  • One Rhythm. Another step in the standardisation of the raw data is the specification of a rhythm, in other words, time synchronisation. All data acquired is marked with a „time stamp“. This enables all the data acquired within a specific time period to be analysed retroactively or prepared for further processing.

How Does Data Acquisition Work?

Data Acquisition and Standardisation

The idea behind Condition Monitoring is based on the acquisition of machine data. The underlying concept of symmedia SP/1 which was designed specifically for the mechanical engineering sector, harnesses the flow of data and converts relevant values into a standardised base format.

To monitor a machine, a wide range of data types must first be acquired and evaluated. One of the biggest challenges of Condition Monitoring is to precisely identify and extract any significant values from the data flow, since at the outset a machine provides a very large volume of totally unfiltered data. This „raw data“ may for instance originate from the machine controllers (live data) or from databases (historic data and log files).

The first step is standardisation. One could imagine this data flow from such diverse sources to be like an orchestra, in which every instrument is playing according to its own internal rules – and in the midst of the noise of this chaos the melody is totally destroyed.

  • One Language. symmedia SP/1 now becomes the conductor who brings the confusion of the various instruments under control. The system automatically recognises the language and format of nearly every data source and converts it into a standardised format. This enables the data items to be „attuned“ and correlated to each other.
  • One Rhythm. Another step in the standardisation of the raw data is the specification of a rhythm, in other words, time synchronisation. All data acquired is marked with a „time stamp“. This enables all the data acquired within a specific time period to be analysed retroactively or prepared for further processing.

Data Acquisition and Standardisation

The idea behind Condition Monitoring is based on the acquisition of machine data. The underlying concept of symmedia SP/1 which was designed specifically for the mechanical engineering sector, harnesses the flow of data and converts relevant values into a standardised base format.

How Does Data Acquisition Work?

To monitor a machine, a wide range of data types must first be acquired and evaluated. One of the biggest challenges of Condition Monitoring is to precisely identify and extract any significant values from the data flow, since at the outset a machine provides a very large volume of totally unfiltered data. This „raw data“ may for instance originate from the machine controllers (live data) or from databases (historic data and log files).

The first step is standardisation. One could imagine this data flow from such diverse sources to be like an orchestra, in which every instrument is playing according to its own internal rules – and in the midst of the noise of this chaos the melody is totally destroyed.

  • One Language. symmedia SP/1 now becomes the conductor who brings the confusion of the various instruments under control. The system automatically recognises the language and format of nearly every data source and converts it into a standardised format. This enables the data items to be „attuned“ and correlated to each other.
  • One Rhythm. Another step in the standardisation of the raw data is the specification of a rhythm, in other words, time synchronisation. All data acquired is marked with a „time stamp“. This enables all the data acquired within a specific time period to be analysed retroactively or prepared for further processing.

How Is Raw Data Processed?

The processing process is performed locally on the Site Control of the machine where the acquired data is compressed, combinations and rules are established and the crucial values are then filtered out of the data flow. The machine operator can now use the information locally to monitor his machine or he can share it with the manufacturer, thereby actively incorporating the manufacturer in the monitoring process.

So that significant values can be created from the raw data, it undergoes a range of processing processes as follows:

  • Data Compression
    The idea behind data compression is that it is not the raw data itself, but only the specific values calculated based on the raw data, that are saved. One frequent approach is to calculate average values within a time period, for example, not to continuously monitor temperature itself, but only average temperature within one hour. A crucial approach of data compression is only to permanently save those data items out of which conclusions on machine status can be obtained.
  • Combination
    In the same way as in a medical diagnosis, the machine status is only rarely derived from one single value. For example, a blocked nose may indicate a cold but if it occurs in spring and is accompanied by runny eyes, then it is much more likely to be hay fever. Machine data operates in a similar way. Therefore, for example, all the values that indicate material fatigue can be amalgamated and monitored together.
  • Contingent Conditions
    In addition to the combination of individual values, data with contingent conditions can also be combined. In this way a specific value is only considered if a further condition is fulfilled. Example: The condition for hay fever is that the symptoms occur in spring. A condition for material fatigue could be that a high vibration value only occurs after a specific number of operating hours.
  • Centralised or decentralised storage
    All data collected via Monitoring is first saved locally and can be transferred to the Central Server either continuously or according to individual rules. If the operator does not want to release any data automatically, there is also the option of saving the data from the Site Control on a computer in the operator’s network.
symmedia SP/1 Monitoring preparation of raw data

How Is Raw Data Processed?

Preparation of Raw Data

The ability to acquire data is one thing, but deriving significant information from it is quite another. symmedia SP/1 filters, combines and compresses machine data in a highly-complex processing process to enable crucial conclusions to be drawn as to the machine status.

The processing process is performed locally on the Site Control of the machine where the acquired data is compressed, combinations and rules are established and the crucial values are then filtered out of the data flow. The machine operator can now use the information locally to monitor his machine or he can share it with the manufacturer, thereby actively incorporating the manufacturer in the monitoring process.

So that significant values can be created from the raw data, it undergoes a range of processing processes as follows:

  • Data Compression
    The idea behind data compression is that it is not the raw data itself, but only the specific values calculated based on the raw data, that are saved. One frequent approach is to calculate average values within a time period, for example, not to continuously monitor temperature itself, but only average temperature within one hour. A crucial approach of data compression is only to permanently save those data items out of which conclusions on machine status can be obtained.
  • Combination
    In the same way as in a medical diagnosis, the machine status is only rarely derived from one single value. For example, a blocked nose may indicate a cold but if it occurs in spring and is accompanied by runny eyes, then it is much more likely to be hay fever. Machine data operates in a similar way. Therefore, for example, all the values that indicate material fatigue can be amalgamated and monitored together.
  • Contingent Conditions
    In addition to the combination of individual values, data with contingent conditions can also be combined. In this way a specific value is only considered if a further condition is fulfilled. Example: The condition for hay fever is that the symptoms occur in spring. A condition for material fatigue could be that a high vibration value only occurs after a specific number of operating hours.
  • Centralised or decentralised storage
    All data collected via Monitoring is first saved locally and can be transferred to the Central Server either continuously or according to individual rules. If the operator does not want to release any data automatically, there is also the option of saving the data from the Site Control on a computer in the operator’s network.
symmedia SP/1 Monitoring preparation of raw data

Preparation of Raw Data

The ability to acquire data is one thing, but deriving significant information from it is quite another. symmedia SP/1 filters, combines and compresses machine data in a highly-complex processing process to enable crucial conclusions to be drawn as to the machine status.

How Is Raw Data Processed?

The processing process is performed locally on the Site Control of the machine where the acquired data is compressed, combinations and rules are established and the crucial values are then filtered out of the data flow. The machine operator can now use the information locally to monitor his machine or he can share it with the manufacturer, thereby actively incorporating the manufacturer in the monitoring process.

So that significant values can be created from the raw data, it undergoes a range of processing processes as follows:

  • Data Compression
    The idea behind data compression is that it is not the raw data itself, but only the specific values calculated based on the raw data, that are saved. One frequent approach is to calculate average values within a time period, for example, not to continuously monitor temperature itself, but only average temperature within one hour. A crucial approach of data compression is only to permanently save those data items out of which conclusions on machine status can be obtained.
  • Combination
    In the same way as in a medical diagnosis, the machine status is only rarely derived from one single value. For example, a blocked nose may indicate a cold but if it occurs in spring and is accompanied by runny eyes, then it is much more likely to be hay fever. Machine data operates in a similar way. Therefore, for example, all the values that indicate material fatigue can be amalgamated and monitored together.
  • Contingent Conditions
    In addition to the combination of individual values, data with contingent conditions can also be combined. In this way a specific value is only considered if a further condition is fulfilled. Example: The condition for hay fever is that the symptoms occur in spring. A condition for material fatigue could be that a high vibration value only occurs after a specific number of operating hours.
  • Centralised or decentralised storage
    All data collected via Monitoring is first saved locally and can be transferred to the Central Server either continuously or according to individual rules. If the operator does not want to release any data automatically, there is also the option of saving the data from the Site Control on a computer in the operator’s network.

What Actions Does symmedia SP/1 Trigger?

When the buoys of the Tsunami warning system in the Indian Ocean report a sudden rise of five metres, the coastal inhabitants are likely to be in danger – however they have not yet been warned. The action „immediate warning to all coastal inhabitants“ must be assigned to the significant value „Five metre rise in sea level“.

However, an action does not always have to be as „dramatic“ as an alarm since even the start of a logging action (data logging) over a specific period or the transfer of specific information to the manufacturer service could, for example, be the consequence of specific values.

A frequent application is data visualisation. Sensor data for example is displayed in dashboards. Information on facility effectiveness is generally displayed in OEE Reports.

symmedia SP/1 Monitoring: actions

What Actions Does symmedia SP/1 Trigger?

From Significant Value to Action

Condition Monitoring on a local basis often does not mean much more than a red light coming on in the event of a fault. If a machine is being monitored remotely, a sophisticated notification and escalation framework is required. symmedia SP/1 has been designed to support both local and global machine monitoring in a wide range of escalation levels.

When the buoys of the Tsunami warning system in the Indian Ocean report a sudden rise of five metres, the coastal inhabitants are likely to be in danger – however they have not yet been warned. The action „immediate warning to all coastal inhabitants“ must be assigned to the significant value „Five metre rise in sea level“.

However, an action does not always have to be as „dramatic“ as an alarm since even the start of a logging action (data logging) over a specific period or the transfer of specific information to the manufacturer service could, for example, be the consequence of specific values.

A frequent application is data visualisation. Sensor data for example is displayed in dashboards. Information on facility effectiveness is generally displayed in OEE Reports.

symmedia SP/1 Monitoring: actions

From Significant Value to Action

Condition Monitoring on a local basis often does not mean much more than a red light coming on in the event of a fault. If a machine is being monitored remotely, a sophisticated notification and escalation framework is required. symmedia SP/1 has been designed to support both local and global machine monitoring in a wide range of escalation levels.

What Actions Does symmedia SP/1 Trigger?

When the buoys of the Tsunami warning system in the Indian Ocean report a sudden rise of five metres, the coastal inhabitants are likely to be in danger – however they have not yet been warned. The action „immediate warning to all coastal inhabitants“ must be assigned to the significant value „Five metre rise in sea level“.

However, an action does not always have to be as „dramatic“ as an alarm since even the start of a logging action (data logging) over a specific period or the transfer of specific information to the manufacturer service could, for example, be the consequence of specific values.

A frequent application is data visualisation. Sensor data for example is displayed in dashboards. Information on facility effectiveness is generally displayed in OEE Reports.

How Does Parts Agent Work?

Parts Agent operates like an octopus and can access the widest range of data sources and comb through them from a sales perspective. For instance, it takes status information from Monitoring and is informed by Maintenance Manager about any pending inspections. If Parts Agent finds indications that parts are needed (e.g. an error message due to a leaking valve from Monitoring or the manufacturer’s note from Maintenance Manager about a wear part that should be exchanged in a specific maintenance task), then an automatic sales process is launched:

  • 1. Step: Alignment with the warehouse
    Parts Agent aligns its requirement information with the inventory status of the operator. This enables it to identify which parts need to be ordered in the near future.
  • 2. Step: Creation of a digital shopping cart
    All parts which Parts Agent has identified as being required are collated into a digital shopping cart and conveniently made available to the operator in the Customer Cockpit. Depending on the connection possibilities, in its compilation Parts Agent can align the delivery times and the anticipated time when the part will be required in order to calculate the optimum moment to place the order.
  • 3. Step: Request
    Based on the digital shopping cart, the operator can now send the Request to the manufacturer. The order number, part description and customer data are sent automatically with the Request.
  • 4. Step: Quote and order
    The manufacturer service compiles a quote based on the Part Request and sends it to the operator. If the manufacturer administers its spare parts via an ERP system, it can provide the operator with prices, availabilities and tracking.

How Does Parts Agent Work?

Parts Agent

Parts Agent is the digital salesman of the manufacturer directly on the machine. It continuously combs through the collated machine data for indications of pending parts requirements. If Parts Agent has identified a requirement it creates an order proposal for the operator – conveniently, in line with need and precisely at the right time.

Parts Agent operates like an octopus and can access the widest range of data sources and comb through them from a sales perspective. For instance, it takes status information from Monitoring and is informed by Maintenance Manager about any pending inspections. If Parts Agent finds indications that parts are needed (e.g. an error message due to a leaking valve from Monitoring or the manufacturer’s note from Maintenance Manager about a wear part that should be exchanged in a specific maintenance task), then an automatic sales process is launched:

  • 1. Step: Alignment with the warehouse
    Parts Agent aligns its requirement information with the inventory status of the operator. This enables it to identify which parts need to be ordered in the near future.
  • 2. Step: Creation of a digital shopping cart
    All parts which Parts Agent has identified as being required are collated into a digital shopping cart and conveniently made available to the operator in the Customer Cockpit. Depending on the connection possibilities, in its compilation Parts Agent can align the delivery times and the anticipated time when the part will be required in order to calculate the optimum moment to place the order.
  • 3. Step: Request
    Based on the digital shopping cart, the operator can now send the Request to the manufacturer. The order number, part description and customer data are sent automatically with the Request.
  • 4. Step: Quote and order
    The manufacturer service compiles a quote based on the Part Request and sends it to the operator. If the manufacturer administers its spare parts via an ERP system, it can provide the operator with prices, availabilities and tracking.

Parts Agent

Parts Agent is the digital salesman of the manufacturer directly on the machine. It continuously combs through the collated machine data for indications of pending parts requirements. If Parts Agent has identified a requirement it creates an order proposal for the operator – conveniently, in line with need and precisely at the right time.

How Does Parts Agent Work?

Parts Agent operates like an octopus and can access the widest range of data sources and comb through them from a sales perspective. For instance, it takes status information from Monitoring and is informed by Maintenance Manager about any pending inspections. If Parts Agent finds indications that parts are needed (e.g. an error message due to a leaking valve from Monitoring or the manufacturer’s note from Maintenance Manager about a wear part that should be exchanged in a specific maintenance task), then an automatic sales process is launched:

  • 1. Step: Alignment with the warehouse
    Parts Agent aligns its requirement information with the inventory status of the operator. This enables it to identify which parts need to be ordered in the near future.
  • 2. Step: Creation of a digital shopping cart
    All parts which Parts Agent has identified as being required are collated into a digital shopping cart and conveniently made available to the operator in the Customer Cockpit. Depending on the connection possibilities, in its compilation Parts Agent can align the delivery times and the anticipated time when the part will be required in order to calculate the optimum moment to place the order.
  • 3. Step: Request
    Based on the digital shopping cart, the operator can now send the Request to the manufacturer. The order number, part description and customer data are sent automatically with the Request.
  • 4. Step: Quote and order
    The manufacturer service compiles a quote based on the Part Request and sends it to the operator. If the manufacturer administers its spare parts via an ERP system, it can provide the operator with prices, availabilities and tracking.

We will call you back!

Rückruf

Contact Person

Vinzenz van Ketwich

Vinzenz van Ketwich
Business Consultant

 

 

Schließt das Actionmenü

Leave a message!

Mail
Schließt das Actionmenü

Appointment for an individual online presentation!

Webinar
Schließt das Actionmenü

Appointment for a presentation

Live
Schließt das Actionmenü

Learn more about our products:

Schließt das Actionmenü